Course Instructor: Jordan Haug

Classroom hours: MW 2:30pm-3:45pm, LA 020

Office Hours: By appointment

Course Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion, students should be able to–

  1. Examine the religious, economic, and structural characteristics of the developing world;
  2. Apply theories of both world systems and modernization to real-life current issues;
  3. Analyze the interaction between beliefs and behavior in villages in the developing world and cultural contexts that are often the target of international development interventions;
  4. Explain ethnographic material about the developing world.

Required Text (2 books)

  • Eversole, E. (2017). Anthropology for Development: From Theory to Practice. New York: Routledge.
  • Bainton, N. (2010). Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.

Coursework Standards

Please review Utah Valley University’s Academic Policies and Standards, where is states that for course work should include “One hour of lecture, plus a minimum of two hours of personal work outside of class, regardless of delivery mode.” That means you should be working at least 6 hours a week on assignments outside of our usual seminar/lecture times.

Seminar Readings

Each seminar will have required readings or videos marketed with bullet points.

Assignment Instructions

More thorough instructions concerning assignments will be given in class. If you have questions about an assignment, please ask for clarifications during class. You will need to attend the course lectures if you want thorough instructions for each assignment.

Class Participation

There are few students enrolled in this course. Therefore, you must attend and participate in discussions.

Sensitive Topics

The study of anthropology may address potentially sensitive topics that a broad range of people face throughout the world. These topics may include issues relating to violence, race, gender, sexuality, kinship, inequality, and state oppression, etc. While I will try to guide us through these topics in a careful manner, it is important to recognize that the discussion of these topics is central to understanding how anthropologists seek to better understand our contemporary world. Constructive participation in these discussions means respectful engagement with the issues and sensitivity to how these discussions may impact fellow students. I will be respectful as well. Unfortunately, recent research has confirmed that the use of “trigger-warnings” can actually be harmful to people, especially those dealing with trauma. I believe issues should challenge us and confronting many of the disturbing aspects of the human experience is essential for understanding human cultural diversity.

Email

Please message me directly through Canvas. When composing emails/messages, please follow the instructions from this useful guide. If you do not follow those instructions, I will not respond to your emails. Awaiting my response is never an excuse for not completing the assignments as described in the syllabus. When in doubt, check the syllabus.

Accessibility and Academic Accommodations

Please review the syllabus on Canvas for more information on university policies, including accessibility and mental health accommodations, prevention of harassment, and plagiarism.

Point Distribution and Late Assignments

Below is a breakdown of the points available in the course. Late assignments will be accepted, but the grade will be automatically reduced by a whole letter grade. There is no time limit on accepting late assignments, but they are also considered late immediately after the assigned time they are due.

POSSIBLE COURSE POINT TOTAL: 1100 points

The grade scale is the following– A: 940-1000; A-: 900-929; B+: 870-899; B: 830-869; B-: 800-829; C+: 770-799; C: 730-769; C-: 700-729; D+: 670-699; D: 630-669; and D-: 600-629.

WEEK 1- WHAT IS DEVELOPMENT?

Aug. 19 (M)- Seminar: Introduction to the Course

Aug. 21 (W)- Seminar: Anthropology of Development in Theory

  • Read: Eversole, R. (2018). “Chapter 1: Anthropology of Development in Theory.” In Anthropology for Development: From Theory to Practice London: Routledge.

WEEK 2- UTILITARIANISM

Aug. 26 (M)- Seminar: Introduction to Utilitarianism

  • Read: Sandel, M. (2009). Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?, Pp. 3-9, 19-21, 31-72. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Aug. 28 (W)- Seminar: Practical Ethics of Development

  • Read: Selections from Singer, P. (2011). Practical Ethics, 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Read: Selections from Singer, P. (2016). Ethics in the Real World: 82 Brief Essays on Things That Matter.  Princeton: Princeton University Press.

WEEK 3- OBLIGATIONS AND REASONS

Sep. 2 (M)- Seminar: [LABOR DAY]

Sep. 4 (W)- Seminar: Reasoning About Results

  • Read: Selections from O’Neill, O. (1986). Faces of Hunger: An Essay on Poverty, Justice and Development. Allen & Unwin.

WEEK 4- DEVELOPMENT IN PRACTICE

Sep. 9 (M)- Seminar: Anthropology of Development in Practice

  • Read: Eversole, R. (2018). “Chapter 2: Anthropology of development in practice.” In Anthropology for Development: From Theory to Practice, Pp. 65-97. London: Routledge.

Sep. 11 (W)- Seminar: An Anthropological Framework for Development

  • Read: Eversole, R. (2018). “Chapter 3: An anthropological framework for development practice.” In Anthropology for Development: From Theory to Practice, Pp. 99-119. London: Routledge.

WEEK 5- TOOLS AND APPROACHES

Sep. 16 (M)- Seminar: Applying the Framework: Tools and Approaches

  • Read: Eversole, R. (2018). “Chapter 4: Applying the framework: Tools and approaches.” In Anthropology for Development: From Theory to Practice, Pp. 121-146. London: Routledge.

Sep. 18 (W)- Seminar: [No seminar]

WEEK 6- THE SCOPE OF THE PROBLEM

Sep. 23 (M)- Seminar: Anthropological Responses to Development Challenges

  • Read: Eversole, R. (2018). “Chapter 5: Anthropological responses to development challenges.” & “Chapter 6: Conclusions: Using anthropology in development work.” In Anthropology for Development: From Theory to Practice, Pp. 147-173. London: Routledge.

Sep. 25 (W)- Seminar: The Development Delusion

  • Read: Hickel, J. (2017). “Chapter 1: The Development Delusion.” In The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets, Pp. 7-32. New York: W.W. Norton.

WEEK 7- UNDERDEVELOPMENT

Sep. 30 (M)- Seminar: The End of Poverty…Has Been Postponed

  • Read: Hickel, J. (2017). “Chapter 2: The End of Poverty…Has Been Postponed.” In The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets, Pp. 33-60. New York: W.W. Norton.

Oct. 2 (W)- Seminar: Where Did Poverty Come From? A Creation Story

  • Read: Hickel, J. (2017). “Chapter 3: Where Did Poverty Come From? A Creation Story.” In The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets, Pp. 63-98. New York: W.W. Norton.

WEEK 8- CHALLENGES IN NEED INTERPRETATION

Oct. 7 (M)- Seminar: Plunder in the 21st Century

  • Read: Hickel, J. (2017). Chapter 7: “Plunder in the 21st Century.” In The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets, Pp. 207-236. New York: W.W. Norton.

Oct. 9 (W)- Seminar: Women, Welfare and the Politics of Need Interpretation

  • Read: Fraser, N. (1989). “Women, Welfare and the Politics of Need Interpretation.” In P. Lassman, ed., Politics and Social Theory, Pp. 104-122. London: Routledge.

WEEK 9- COMPASSION AND LOCALITY

Oct. 14 (M)- Seminar: Calculating Compassion

  • Read: Green, M. (2011). “Calculating Compassion: Accounting for Some Categorical Practices in International Development.” In D. Mosse, ed. Adventures in Aidland: The Anthropology of Professionals in International Development, Pp. 33-56. New York: Berghahn.

Oct. 16 (W)- Seminar: Community Responses to Mining in Melanesia

  • Filer, C. & M. Macintyre (2006). Grass Roots and Deep Holes: Community Responses to Mining in MelanesiaThe Contemporary Pacific18(2): 215-231.

WEEK 10- LIHIR’S DESTINY

Oct. 21 (M)- Seminar: Lihir Destiny, P. 1

  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). Chapter 1: “Introduction” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.
  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). Chapter 2: “The Presence of the Mine.” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.

Oct. 23 (W)- Seminar: Lihir Destiny, P. 2

  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). 3: “Las Kantri: Lihir Before the Mining Era” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.

WEEK 11- LIFE AT A GOLD MINING COMMUNITY

Oct. 28 (M)- Seminar: Lihir Destiny, P. 3

  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). Chapter 4: “Lihir Custom as an Ethnographic Subject” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.

Oct. 30 (W)- Seminar: Lihir Destiny, P. 4

  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). Chapter 5: “When Cargo Arrives” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.

WEEK 12- THE AFTERMATH

Nov. 4 (M)- Seminar: Lihir Destiny, P. 5

  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). Chapter 6: “Personal Viability and the Lihir Destiny Plan.” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.

Nov. 6 (W)- Seminar: Lihir Destiny, P. 6

  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). Chapter 7: “Custom Reconfigured” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.
  • Read: Bainton, N. (2010). Chapter 8: “Conclusion.” In Lihir Destiny: Cultural Responses to Mining in Melanesia. Canberra: ANU Press.

WEEK 13- A JUSTICE FUTURE?

Nov. 11 (M)- Seminar: Sustainable Development

  • Kirsch, S. (2010). Sustainable Mining. Dialectical Anthropology 34(1): 87-93.
  • Chao, S. (2019, Jun. 11). The Truth About “Sustainable” Palm Oil. Sapiens.

Nov. 13 (W)- Seminar: From Charity to Justice

  • Read: Hickel, J. (2017). “Chapter 8: From Charity to Justice” & “Chapter 9: The Necessary Madness of Imagination.” In The Divide: Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets, Pp. 239-285. New York: W.W. Norton.

WEEK 14- THE BENEFICIARY AND HUMANITARIAN REASON

Nov. 18 (M)- Seminar: The Beneficiary

  • Robbins, B. (2017). “The Starving Child.” In The Beneficiary. Durham: Duke University Press.

Nov. 20 (W)- Seminar: Critique of Humanitarian Reason

  • Read: Robbins, B. (2019, Apr. 30). The Politics of Life: Rethinking Humanitarianism in an Age of Planetary Inequality. The Nation.
  • Watch: Fassin, D. (2010, Feb. 17). Critique of Humanitarian Reason. Institute for Advanced Study [1 hr. 18 mins].

WEEK 15- [Thanksgiving Break]

WEEK 16- COURSE SUMMARY

Dec. 2 (M)- Seminar: Climate Project, Class Presentation

Dec. 4 (W)- Seminar: Climate Project, Class Presentation

Perusall Comments (375 points):

  • Assignment 1: Aug. 21 (15 points, due on Aug. 21, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 2: Aug. 26 (15 points, due on Aug. 26, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 3: Aug. 28 (15 points, due on Aug. 28, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 4: Sep. 4 (15 points, due on Sep. 4, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 5: Sep. 9 (15 points, due on Sep. 9, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 6: Sep. 11 (15 points, due on Sep. 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 7: Sep. 16 (15 points, due on Sep. 16, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 8: Sep. 23 (15 points, due on Sep. 23, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 9: Sep. 25 (15 points, due on Sep. 25, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 10: Sep. 30 (15 points, due on Sep. 30, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 11: Oct. 2 (15 points, due on Oct. 2, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 12: Oct. 7 (15 points, due on Oct. 7, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 13: Oct. 9 (15 points, due on Oct. 9, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 14: Oct. 14 (15 points, due on Oct. 14, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 15: Oct. 16 (15 points, due on Oct. 16, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 16: Oct. 21 (15 points, due on Oct. 21, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 18: Oct. 23 (15 points, due on Oct. 23, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 19: Oct. 28 (15 points, due on Oct. 28, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 20: Oct. 30 (15 points, due on Oct. 30, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 21: Nov. 4 (15 points, due on Nov. 4, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 22: Nov. 6 (15 points, due on Nov. 6, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 23: Nov. 11 (15 points, due on Nov. 11, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 24: Nov. 13 (15 points, due on Nov. 13, 2:30pm).
  • Assignment 25: Nov. 18 (15 points, due on Nov. 18, 2:30pm).

Self-Grading (125 points):

  • Self-Grading 1: Aug. 21 (5 points, due on Aug. 21, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 2: Aug. 26 (5 points, due on Aug. 26, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 3: Aug. 28 (5 points, due on Aug. 28, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 4: Sep. 4 (5 points, due on Sep. 4, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 5: Sep. 9 (5 points, due on Sep. 9, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 6: Sep. 11 (5 points, due on Sep. 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 7: Sep. 16 (5 points, due on Sep. 16, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 8: Sep. 23 (5 points, due on Sep. 23, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 9: Sep. 25 (5 points, due on Sep. 25, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 10: Sep. 30 (5 points, due on Sep. 30, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 11: Oct. 2 (5 points, due on Oct. 2, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 12: Oct. 7 (5 points, due on Oct. 7, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 13: Oct. 9 (5 points, due on Oct. 9, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 14: Oct. 14 (5 points, due on Oct. 14, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 15: Oct. 16 (5 points, due on Oct. 16, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 16: Oct. 21 (5 points, due on Oct. 21, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 18: Oct. 23 (5 points, due on Oct. 23, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 19: Oct. 28 (5 points, due on Oct. 28, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 20: Oct. 30 (5 points, due on Oct. 30, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 21: Nov. 4 (5 points, due on Nov. 4, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 22: Nov. 6 (5 points, due on Nov. 6, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 23: Nov. 11 (5 points, due on Nov. 11, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 24: Nov. 13 (5 points, due on Nov. 13, 2:30pm).
  • Self-Grading 25: Nov. 18 (5 points, due on Nov. 18, 2:30pm).

Seminar Discussions (250 points):

  • Discussion 1: Aug. 21 (10 points, due on Aug. 21, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 2: Aug. 26 (10 points, due on Aug. 26, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 3: Aug. 28 (10 points, due on Aug. 28, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 4: Sep. 4 (10 points, due on Sep. 4, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 5: Sep. 9 (10 points, due on Sep. 9, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 6: Sep. 11 (10 points, due on Sep. 11, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 7: Sep. 16 (10 points, due on Sep. 16, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 8: Sep. 23 (10 points, due on Sep. 23, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 9: Sep. 25 (10 points, due on Sep. 25, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 10: Sep. 30 (10 points, due on Sep. 30, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 11: Oct. 2 (10 points, due on Oct. 2, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 12: Oct. 7 (10 points, due on Oct. 7, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 13: Oct. 9 (10 points, due on Oct. 9, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 14: Oct. 14 (10 points, due on Oct. 14, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 15: Oct. 16 (10 points, due on Oct. 16, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 16: Oct. 21 (10 points, due on Oct. 21, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 18: Oct. 23 (10 points, due on Oct. 23, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 19: Oct. 28 (10 points, due on Oct. 28, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 20: Oct. 30 (10 points, due on Oct. 30, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 21: Nov. 4 (10 points, due on Nov. 4, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 22: Nov. 6 (10 points, due on Nov. 6, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 23: Nov. 11 (10 points, due on Nov. 11, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 24: Nov. 13 (10 points, due on Nov. 13, 11:59pm).
  • Discussion 25: Nov. 18 (10 points, due on Nov. 18, 11:59pm).

Written Assignments (175 points):

  • Lihir Destiny (100 points, due Dec. 9th 2:50pm).
  • Climate Project (75 points, due Dec. 9th 2:50pm).

Class Presentations (100 points):

  • Class Presentation (100 point, due Dec. 2nd or Dec. 4th).

Media Response (75 points):

  1. Response: Part 2 and 3 of the Highland Trilogy (50 points, Oct. 21, at 2:30pm).
  2. Response: “Critique of Humanitarian Reason” (25 points, due Dec. 2nd at 2:30pm).