COURSE INSTRUCTOR: Jordan Haug

Email: jordanhaug@gmail.com

Classroom hours: MW 10am-10:50am (JSB 140), 3-3:50pm (KMBL 245).

Office Hours: By appointment

This brief video by Tara Westover (a BYU alumna) summarizes a great deal of how I think we should be approaching education. Please consider her primary point, that an education is not the institution, it is a way of engaging the world. This, too, is the essence of anthropology.

COURSE SUMMARY

This course will cover:

  1. An introduction to social and cultural anthropology. We will be discussing the central topics and themes of anthropological inquiry and what it means to “think like an anthropologist.”
  2. The central debates of the discipline. This will include the competing theoretical and methodological perspectives in the discipline.
  3. Applied anthropology. We will be discussing how anthropological knowledge and perspectives can contribute to a wide array of vocational and everyday life applications.

COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students will learn how to:

  1. Use holistic anthropological insights in understanding complex world problems.
  2. Use anthropological methods, such as ethnography, to address practical problems.
  3. Develop critical reasoning skills through reading, writing, and groups discussions.

Required Text (3 books)

  • Engelke, M. (2018). How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Barker, J. (2016). Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest, 2nd ed. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Pein, C. (2018). Live Work Work Die: A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley. New York: Metropolitan Books.

Coursework Standards

Please review the BYU newsletter guide, “How to Build a Class Schedule.” This is a three-credit course, so you should be spending between 6 and 9 hours on coursework outside of the lecture, per week. Some weeks it will be on the high end of those 9 hours, and on others, it will be on the low end of those 6 hours.

Seminar Readings

Each seminar will have required readings or videos marketed with bullet points. Besides the required text (see above), all other readings will be provided through Canvas. Readings or videos preceded with a “suggested” title are make available only if students are interested in pursuing the subject further on their own. The lectures may draw from suggested readings, but students will not be tested on the material only given in the suggested readings.

Note Taking

The use of laptops, tablets, and smartphones is strictly prohibited in seminars. If a TA finds you using either device outside of the first and last 5 minutes of class, you will automatically lose all points for that week’s scores. Exceptions will only be granted to students who get permissions for accommodations from The University Accessibility Center. Many studies. have found that allowing laptops, tablets, or smartphones in a classroom drastically effects the learning environment of all students, not just the ones using the technology. Content comprehension and memory retention are also drastically improved if you use a pen or pencil and a simple pad of paper to take notes on during class seminars. You will be tested on the content discussed in the following videos.

Assignment Instructions

More thorough instructions concerning assignments will be given in class. If you have questions about an assignment, please ask for clarifications during class. You will need to attend the course lectures if you want thorough instructions for each assignment.

Class Participation

Class Participation. There are few students enrolled in this course, therefore, it is absolutely essential that you attend and participate in discussions. Full participation points will be awarded according to the frequency of attendance and participation in class discussions. We’ll discuss during the seminar exactly what those standards may be. Participation in the course is worth 60 points.

Email

Please email me directly at jordanhaug@gmail.com. When composing emails follow the instructions from this useful guide. If you do not follow those instructions, I will not respond to your emails. During weekdays, I will make my best effort to respond to emails. However, awaiting my response is never an excuse for not completing assignments described in the syllabus. When in doubt, check the syllabus.

Accessibility and Academic Accommodations

If you suspect or are aware that you have a disability, you are strongly encouraged to contact the University Accessibility Center (UAC) located at 2170 WSC (801-422-2767) as soon as possible. A disability is a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Examples include vision or hearing impairments, physical disabilities, chronic illnesses, emotional disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety), learning disorders, and attention disorders (e.g., ADHD). When registering with the UAC, the disability will be evaluated, and eligible students will receive assistance in obtaining reasonable university approved accommodations. Service animals are allowed in the classroom. Generally, animals that are strictly for emotional support or comfort are not allowed in the classroom. Questions may be directed to the University Accessibility Center.

Point Distribution and Late Assignments

Below is a breakdown of the points available in the course. Late assignments will be accepted, but the grade will be automatically reduced by a whole letter grade per week after the due date.

Quizzes (340 points):

  • Quiz: Week 1 (40 points, due Sep. 10th at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 2 (30 points, due Sep. 17th at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 3 (30 points, due Sep. 24st at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 4 (30 points, due Oct. 1st at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 5 (30 points, due Oct. 8th at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 6 (30 points, due Oct. 15th at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 7 (30 points, due Oct. 22nd at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 8 (30 points, due Oct. 29th at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 9 (30 points, due Nov. 5th at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 10 (30 points, due Nov. 12th at 10 am).
  • Quiz: Week 13 (30 points, due Dec. 3rd at 10 am).

Section Participation (190 points):

  • Section Participation: Week 1 (10 points)
  • Section Participation: Week 2 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 3 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 5 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 6 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 7 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 8 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 9 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 10 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 11 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 13 (15 points).
  • Section Participation: Week 14 (15 points).

Discussions (140-175 points):

  • Discussions: a trip to the museum or cinema (10 points).
  • Discussions: “Mistaken Identities” (60 points) or “Theology and the Anthropology of Christian Life” (75 points).
  • Discussions: Department guest lectures (60-90 points).

Assignments (350 points):

  • Assignment: Ancestral Lines (120 points, due Aug. 10th at midnight).
  • Assignment: Personal Ethnography (100 points).
  • Assignment: Final paper on Live Work Work Die (130 points, due Aug. 10th at midnight).

POSSIBLE COURSE POINT TOTAL: 1055 points

The grade scale is the following– A: 930-1055; A-: 900-929; B+: 870-899; B: 830-869; B-: 800-829; C+: 770-799; C: 730-769; C-: 700-729; D+: 670-699; D: 630-669; and D-: 600-629.

WEEK 1- “THE FAMILIAR AND THE STRANGE”                     

September 5 (W)- Seminar: What is Anthropology?

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Introduction: “The Familiar and the Strange.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

September 7 (F)- Sections: Review of the syllabus and first lecture.

  • See instructions for your section.

WEEK 2- CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION

September 10 (M)- Seminar: Culture

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 1: “Culture.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Suggested: Nader, L. (2017). “The Development of Anthropological Ideas.” In Perspectives: An Open Invitation to Cultural Anthropology.

September 12 (W)- Seminar: Civilization

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 2: “Civilization.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Graeber, D. and D. Wengrow. (2018, Mar. 2). “How to change the course of human history.” Eurozine.

September 14 (F)- Applied Sections: Careers in Museum Anthropology

  • See materials on museum studies.

WEEK 3- VALUES AND RELIGION

September 17 (M)- Seminar: Values

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 3: “Values.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Watch: Ball, M. (2017, May 27). Want to save animal lives without going veg? Eat beef, not chicken. Vox [4 mins].
  • Suggested: Listen- Wong, J. (2018, May 30). Is Eating Plants Wrong? BBC World Service [27 mins].
  • Suggested: Robbins, J. and J. Sommerschuh (2016). “Values.” The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Anthropology.

September 19 (W)- Seminar: Religion 

  • Henninger-Rener, S. (2017). “Religion.” In Perspectives: An Open Invitation to Cultural Anthropology.
  • Omri, E. (2018, Jan. 10). “For the looking.” The Immanent Frame.

September 21 (F)- Applied Sections: Careers in Law

  • See materials on religious freedom and legal pluralism.

WEEK 4- CULTURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

September 24 (M)- Seminar: The Anthropocene

  • Wallace-Wells, D. (2017, Jul. 14). “The Uninhabitable Earth, Annotated Edition.” New York Magazine.
  • Middleton, G.D. (2017, Nov. 16). “Do civilizations collapse?” Aeon.
  • O’Donnell, J. (2017, Sept. 15). “How Vulnerable Are We to Collapse?” Sapiens.

September 26 (W)- Seminar: Environmental Anthropology

  • Palmer, C.T. (2017). “Culture and Sustainability: Environmental Anthropology in the Anthropocene.” In Perspectives: An Open Invitation to Cultural Anthropology.
  • Vidal, J. (2015, Nov. 26). Mekong: A River Rising. The Guardian.

September 28 (F)- Applied Sections: Careers in Development

  • See materials on the environmental anthropology and development.

WEEK 5- CULTURE AND ECONOMICS

October 1 (M)- Seminar: Economics

  • Lyon, S. (2017). “Economics.” In Perspectives: An Open Invitations to Cultural Anthropology.

October 3 (W)- Seminar: Value

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 4: “Value.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

October 5 (F)- Applied Sections: Careers in Business Anthropology

  • See materials on business anthropology.

WEEK 6- KINSHIP AND THE FAMILY

October 8 (M)- Seminar: Descent

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 5: “Blood.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Anderson, R. (2018, May 25). “About those Ancestry dot com commercials.” Anthrodendum.

October 10 (W)- Seminar: Affiliation

  • Gilliland, M.K. (2017). “Family and Marriage.” In Perspectives: An Open Invitation to Cultural Anthropology.
  • Geertz, C. (2001, Oct. 18). “The Visit.” New York Review of Books.

October 12 (F)- Applied Sections: Debates in Government Policy

  • See materials on government policy, religious freedom, and plural marriage.

WEEK 7- IDENTITY AND RACISM

October 15 (M)- Seminar: Identity

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 6: “Identity.” How to Think Like an Anthropologist. In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Hill, J.H. (2017, Jul. 27). “A Linguist Walks Into a Mexican Restaurant.” Edible: Baja Arizona.

See supplementary materials on race.

October 17 (W)- Seminar: Racism and Global Inequality

  • Martin, C. (2016, Jan. 11). “The Reductive Seduction of Other People’s Problems.” BrightMag.
  • Visit: http://humanitariansoftinder.com.
  • Cole, T. (2012). “The White-Savior Industrial Complex.” The Atlantic.
  • Goldberg, S. (2018, Apr.). “For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist. To Rise Above Our Past, We Must Acknowledge It.” National Geographic.
  • Bond, C. (2017, Nov. 28). “Is chronicling Indigenous despair the only way we can get on television?” The Guardian.

See supplemental materials on racism in the United States of America.

October 19 (F)- Applied Sections: Careers in International Aid

  • See materials on aid-work.

WEEK 8- POWER AND GENDER

October 22 (M)- Seminar: Authority

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 7: “Authority.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • West, P. (2013). “My Year in Mansplaining.”

October 24 (W)- Seminar: Women in Public

  • Beard, M. (2017). Selections from Women and Power: A Manifesto. New York: Liveright.
  • Hess, A. (2014, Jan. 6). “Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet.” Pacific Standard.

October 26 (F)- Applied Sections: Careers in Marketing

  • See materials on gender equality, human relations, and public policy.

WEEK 9- WAYS OF KNOWING AND BEING

October 29 (M)- Seminar: Epistemology

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 8: “Reason.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

October 31 (W)- Seminar: Ontology

  • Engelke, M. (2018). Chapter 9: “Nature.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

November 1 (F)- Sections: Careers in Marketing

  • See materials on marketing ethnography.

WEEK 10- FIELDWORK AND ETHNOGRAPHY

November 5 (M)- Seminar: Ethnographic Fieldwork 

  • Nelson, K. (2017). “Doing Fieldwork: Methods in Cultural Anthropology.” In Perspectives: An Open Invitation to Cultural Anthropology.
  • Engelke, M. (2018). Conclusion: “Think Like an Anthropologist.” In How to Think Like an Anthropologist. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

November 7 (W)- Seminar: Lecture on Ethnography

  • Barker, J. (2016). Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest, 2nd ed. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

November 9 (F)- Sections: Ethnographic Project

  • Consulting time with TAs over your ethnographic project.

WEEK 11- ETHNOGRAPHY IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA

November 12 (M)- Seminar: Lecture on Ethnography

  • Keep reading Ancestral Lines.

November 14 (W)- Seminar: Recorded Lecture on Papua New Guinea

  • Keep reading Ancestral Lines.

November 16 (F)- Sections: Book Review

  • Consulting time with TAs about your review of Ancestral Lines.

WEEK 12- CULTURAL CHANGE

November 19 (M)- Seminar: Ancestral Lines

  • Finish Ancestral Lines.

November 20 (T)- Sections: Friday Instruction

  • Discuss with your TA your paper on Ancestral Lines.

WEEK 13- MYTHOLOGY AND CRITIQUE

November 26 (M)- Seminar: Myth and Ritual in Politics

  • Watch segments of Professional Wrestling clips (provided later in the semester).

November 28 (W)- Seminar: Capitalism and Critique

  • Ancestral Lines Paper is due at 10am.
  • Gordon, J. (2016, May 27). Is Everything Wrestling? New York Times.
  • Rogers, N. (2017, Apr. 25). How Wrestling Explains Alex Jones and Donald Trump. New York Times.
  • Roose, K. (2018, May 16). The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can. New York Times.

See supplemental material.

November 30 (F)- Sections: Ethnography Project

  • This is your final time to consult with your TAs about the progress of your ethnographic project.

WEEK 14- ETHNOGRAPHY AND SILICON VALLEY

December 3 (M)- Seminar: Live Work Work Die, Part I

  • Pein, C. (2018). Live Work Work Die: A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley. New York: Metropolitan Books.

December 5 (W)- Seminar: Live Work Work Die, Part II

  • Live Work Work Die.

December 7 (F)- Sections: Tutorial on Making the Familiar Strange

  • TA’s will be walking students through possibilities of making sense of Corey Pein’s Live Work Work Die.

WEEK 15- COURSE SUMMARY

December 10 (M)- Seminar: Live Work Work Die, [Meet as sections]

  • Live Work Work Die.
  • García Martínez, A. (2018, Jul. 9). How Silicon Valley Fuels an Informal Caste System. Wired.
  • Tarnoff, B. and M. Weigel (2018, May 3). “Why Silicon Valley can’t fix itself.” The Guardian.

December 12 (W)- Seminar: Course Summary

  • Peters, J.D. (2018, Jan. 22). “In heaven as it is on earth.” The Immanent Frame.

Please follow the instructions given by TAs in your sections for each of these assignments.

    • Ancestral Lines (100 points, due Nov. 26th 10 am).
    • Ethnographic fieldwork project (150 points).
    • Final paper on Live Work Work Die (130 points, due Dec. 20th at midnight).
  • Quiz for Week 1 (40 points, due Sep. 10th at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 2 (30 points, due Sep. 17th at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 3 (30 points, due Sep. 24st at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 4 (30 points, due Oct. 1st at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 5 (30 points, due Oct. 8th at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 6 (30 points, due Oct. 15th at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 7 (30 points, due Oct. 22nd at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 8 (30 points, due Oct. 29th at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 9 (30 points, due Nov. 5th at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 10 (30 points, due Nov. 12th at 10 am).
  • Quiz for Week 13 (30 points, due Dec. 3rd at 10 am).

A trip to the museum of the cinema:

Join a discussion group a trip to the museum or a screening of a film (10 points).

Public lectures: 

Choose one of the following options:

1.) Discuss Kwame Anthony Appiah’s 2016 BBC Reith Lecture series, “Mistake Identities” (15 points each, total 60 points).

  • Lecture 1: “Creed” [56 mins].
  • Lecture 2: “Country [56 mins].
  • Lecture 3: “Colour [56 mins].
  • Lecture 4: “Culture [56 mins].

 

 

 

or

 

2.) Discuss Joel Robbins’s 2018 Stanton Lectures, “Theology and the Anthropology of Christian Life” (15 points each, total 75 points).

 

 

Guest Lectures:

Discussions for Department of Anthropology guest lectures (15 points each, 60-90 points possible).

  1. Lecture:
  2. Lecture:
  3. Lecture:
  4. Lecture:
  5. Lecture:
  6. Lecture: